The Man Behind the La Voie Persona Is Back in the Public Eye

Who is Christopher LaVoie? Man behind ‘4 Days’ reality shows has history of run-ins with police, dubious business ventures and more The man who founded 4 Days in New York City in 2004 and…

The Man Behind the La Voie Persona Is Back in the Public Eye

Who is Christopher LaVoie? Man behind ‘4 Days’ reality shows has history of run-ins with police, dubious business ventures and more

The man who founded 4 Days in New York City in 2004 and helped produce the controversial reality shows that aired for 14 seasons on cable network TLC is now a multimillionaire and a married, father of two. His name is Christopher LaVoie, and he is the founder of an organization called the La Voie Foundation. The organization was initially created to help raise funds for people suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. But its mission has long stretched far beyond that, having evolved into a cause about which LaVoie himself has no clear thoughts.

LaVoie has spent his life operating in the shadows, behind the scenes, and, for years, his personal life has been a mystery. But with his latest revelation — that he’s gay — the once-unknown man behind the La Voie persona is making headlines again.

In 2016, LaVoie wrote a lengthy blog post, titled “How I Became the Owner of a Fortune,” explaining his decision to sell his publishing company, and his decision to go public with the details. He wrote about how he became the owner of the La Voil Foundation, which he established in 2009, and how he had started to write the blog to give his employees more insight into the work of La Voie.

In the post, he explained how he had become involved with the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Foundation as a participant in the charity auction of 2008, which was designed to help get people with CFS more involved with their lives. But he added that while he was working on the auction, he became a huge supporter of the CFS cause and became the “president of this fabulous organization,” which he would eventually use for his own foundation. He wrote that his “experiences at the auction were very positive and I made a long term commitment to this cause.”

LaVoie told the Guardian that he had used the auction to help raise some money for the charity, but also hinted that he might have been trying to help CFS patients gain greater control over their lives by getting them more involved with their work. “Maybe they didn’t want to do the stuff they did before, and I wanted my employees to have a voice in their lives

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